Not all survey monuments are created equal

It is a very good idea to know where your property monuments are – specifically, not generally as in “over there somewhere.” Ideally, a responsible property owner can go right to their property markers and point to them. The problem is that standard survey monuments have a bad habit of fading into obscurity. A standard monument is Tennessee is usually a 5/8″ or 1/2″ piece of rebar, driven flush with the ground, and topped with a plastic cap emblazoned with the surveyors name and license number. The fact that the monument is typically driven flush, so as not to interfere with mowing, brush clearing and such, also means that it is easily lost in the grass. This standard type survey monument is comparable to the old Ford Pinto: functional and low budget, it does the job. 99% of all surveys get this type of monument.
For those who prefer Cadillacs though, there are myriad other options. The ‘gold standard’ monument would be a custom made survey disk identifying the property owner, set in concrete. This is the most expensive option due to its custom nature and the intensive labor of hauling, mixing, and pouring concrete in place. This monument is also typically set flush with the ground but is much less likely to be overgrown due to its large footprint (8-10 inches in diameter). See the Disney World survey marker pictured. One glance leaves no doubt about the identity of the owner. It is a great option for people with an unlimited budget.
For something in the medium price range (though still considerable more expensive than the ‘Pinto’) Berntsen has several drivable pipe systems with customized survey caps.
For rural and large wooded areas, Carsonite witness posts are very helpful for identifying the presence of nearby survey markers. These are tough composite posts with a permanent orange color and an identifying label warning all comers “Do not disturb nearby survey markers.” Those who are more serious about protecting and identifying their property may wish to consider these extra-ordinary options.

It is a very good idea to know where your property monuments are – specifically, not generally as in “over there

Plastic survey caps

Plastic survey caps

somewhere.” Ideally, a responsible property owner can go right to their property markers and point to them. The problem is that standard survey monuments have a bad habit of fading into obscurity. A standard monument is Tennessee is usually a 5/8″ or 1/2″ piece of rebar, driven flush with the ground, and topped with a plastic cap emblazoned with the surveyors name and license number. The fact that the monument is typically driven flush, so as not to interfere with mowing, brush clearing and such, also means that it is easily lost in the grass. This standard type survey monument is comparable to the old Ford Pinto: functional and low budget, it does the job. 99% of all surveys get this type of monument.

For those who prefer Cadillacs though, there are myriad other options. The ‘gold standard’ monument would be a custom made survey disk identifying the property owner, set in concrete. This is the most

Disney World Survey Marker

Disney World Survey Marker

expensive option due to its custom nature and the intensive labor of hauling, mixing, and pouring concrete in place. This monument is also typically set flush with the ground but is much less likely to be overgrown due to its large footprint (8-10 inches in diameter). See the Disney World survey marker pictured. One glance leaves no doubt about the identity of the owner. It is a great option for people with an unlimited budget.

For something in the medium price range (though still considerably more expensive than the ‘Pinto’) Berntsen has several drivable pipe systems with customized survey caps.

Carsonite Marker

Carsonite Marker

For rural and large wooded areas, Carsonite witness posts are very helpful for identifying the presence of nearby survey markers. These are tough composite posts with a permanent orange color and an identifying label warning all comers “Do not disturb nearby survey marker.” Those who are more serious about protecting and identifying their property may wish to consider these extra-ordinary options.

By | 2009-10-19T20:52:12+00:00 October 19th, 2009|Due Diligence, Property Rights, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Not all survey monuments are created equal

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